Monday, March 23, 2009

from Webware

March 14, 2009 6:00 AM PDT

Get ready for fantasy baseball--18 top sites

by Don Reisinger

Baseball season is almost under way. So it's time we all get online and start forming our fantasy leagues. Perennial favorite sites from ESPN, Yahoo, and will probably top the list for most people when they decide which service to use, but more goes into fantasy baseball than simply signing up for leagues. What about stats? Did you forget about the news? Did you happen to remember scouting tools?

Hear are the rest of the sites you need.

Step 1: Form the league

There are a number of fine league-building services out there, but if you want to have the best experience, stick to these selected few:

CBS Sports Not only is CBS Sports' Fantasy Baseball league free, it provides real-time scoring, live chat so you can talk with buddies during the game, and adequate player news and stats to help you make more informed decisions. I've used it a few times over the past five years and find it to be easy to use and high-powered for a private or public league. Disclosure: CBS Sports and CNET are owned by the same parent company: CBS.

ESPN Fantasy Baseball

ESPN Fantasy Baseball provides an easy-to-use interface.

(Credit: Don Reisinger/CNET)

ESPN Fantasy Baseball I've also used ESPN's fantasy sports services for years, and I've been impressed with how much they offer. Leagues are free, player news and stats come straight from ESPN, one of the best sources for sports news, and managing your team couldn't be easier. But ESPN's penchant for charging for extra scouting help and more in-depth player information is annoying. If you want the most basic offering for your fantasy baseball league, you'll probably want to use Major League Baseball's service. It's free and makes it easy to set up a league. But I'm generally unimpressed with its stat tracking, and managing a team isn't nearly as easy as it is in competing services. It's a well-known fantasy site, but it's not the best.

Yahoo Sports Yahoo was one of the first companies to start fantasy leagues. More than a decade later, it's still providing an outstanding experience. All the leagues are free, player information is always up-to-date and reliable, and the service's stat tracking is second to none. Yahoo does charge some hefty fees for access to a draft kit ($9.99) and a scouting report ($14.99), but it's still a great service.

Step 2: Find the right players

Now that you've found the right fantasy baseball service, you need to find the players that will take you to the World Series and help you beat your friends. Usually, the fantasy baseball services have only basic stats. Going outside your league site for full information is worth the effort. expects Ichiro to have another good year.

(Credit: Don Reisinger/CNET)

DraftHelp As someone who doesn't spend too much time watching many other teams besides my beloved Yankees, I don't know too many players from other teams. That's why DraftHelp comes in handy each year. I go to the site, find depth charts for teams and get tips on who to pick at each position. But the site's projected stats pages is what I use most often because it tells me, based on past performance, what a player's expected year-end stats will be. They're not always right, but they tend to be close. And having that "cheat sheet" comes in handy when I need to find an advantage over competitors.

ProFantasyBaseball If you want information quickly and you don't want to spend time crunching the numbers yourself, is a great place to start. It provides you with all the best picks for your draft and provides you with information about "sleepers"--players who might have had good years, but aren't so well known--as well as printable rankings so you know which players are the best at every position. And it's free.

RotoAuthority RotoAuthority won't provide you with draft kits and it won't even give you all the stats you need from previous years to help you make more informed decisions. But it does provide you with everything from the top players to pick in this year's draft to player projections, in a blog that's updated daily. It's a nice site to check out after you've performed your research elsewhere.

SportsReference If you want to do the heavy lifting yourself, look no further than Baseball Reference from the SportsReference family of sites. It provides exhaustive research on every known baseball player from the minor leagues to the majors and gives you the result of every game dating back decades. You won't believe how much information this site has. But be aware that you will need to do all the number-crunching yourself.

Step 3: Managing your team

Now that your team is in place, you need to make sure you keep abreast of all the news and events surrounding your players to ensure you're making the best fielding decisions each day. In fantasy baseball, your work is never done.

BaseballNewsCentral BaseballNewsCentral might not be the best-looking site and you won't find much information about transactions or injuries, but it does a fine job of separating news by team. Each time the Associated Press releases a story about something related to baseball, BaseballNewsCentral updates its site immediately. It might not become your daily haunt, but you'll definitely find some use in it.


BenchCoach lets you know how your players are performing.

(Credit: Don Reisinger/CNET)

BenchCoach BenchCoach is unique in this roundup because it does something other services won't: it allows you to import your fantasy baseball team and it will then analyze your roster, give you advice on how to improve it, and project your success. Even better, its forums section is a superb resource for getting in touch with folks who are expert fantasy baseball players. It's a must-stop for any fantasy baseball manager.

FantasyBaseballChamp Sometimes, we just don't have time to spend searching through mass quantities of player information. For those moments, FantasyBaseballChamp will come in handy, thanks to its tables showing real-time rankings of players based on their expected fantasy performance and articles on mid-season management and advice. Most of the information is in-depth and all of it is actionable. But if you want more than just one person's advice, you probably won't find too much value in this site.

SandlotShrink If you want the best information available on the Web about sports, go to SandlotShrink, pay the $89 for a one-year subscription to the site, and enjoy the content. The site is written by some of the top journalists in the business, and includes projections, answers to all your questions, and much more. You can spend hours on the site and not get bored. The content is that good.

SportingNews Having information and the news at your fingertips is important when getting ready to manage your team all year. That's why I usually go to SportingNews to find out information about my players quickly. The news is categorized by team, player, or injuries, and, in a matter of seconds, you'll be able to check your team's status. It's a fine destination if you're not too happy with your fantasy league's built-in news updates.

All the rest

If you still aren't satisfied working through the sources I've listed above, I have even more for you. These are general purpose and don't necessarily fit into a category above. But they're still worth trying out.

Baseball America As a manger of a fantasy baseball league, you need to remember that you can't just keep a watchful eye on the MLB. Sometimes, sleeper stars come from the minor leagues. And that's where Baseball America, with its thorough reporting on the world of Minor League Baseball, comes in. It includes stats, news, and star player information. Keep a watchful eye on this site.

Baseball Monster When you're ready to start making changes to your team, or you need to find the single player that will provide the best Earned Run Average for the season, Baseball Monster is a great place to start. The site allows you to filter players by any stat you can think of. Want to know who leads the league in on-base percentage? Baseball Monster will tell you. Want to find out which first basemen has the best average with hitters in scoring position over the past three days for an American League East team? Baseball Monster will deliver that answer too.


FanGraph's graphs are second to none.

(Credit: Don Reisinger/CNET Networks)

FanGraphs FanGraphs isn't necessarily designed for fantasy baseball players, since you can access information from most major sports, but it's still a great visual tool that will let you know where players on your team are headed. Once you get to FanGraphs, you can find a player or team and project their future success based on prior performances. The site graphs any information you ask for and helps you see, visually, how your team should perform going forward. I use it when things aren't going so well to see where I can make changes and improve my chances.

RotoTimes If you're looking for basic news and statistical information that's designed specifically for the fantasy baseball player in mind, look no further than RotoTimes. See, most sports sites write their news stories for general readers and fans. RotoTimes publishes news stories that will not only give you the lowdown on what's happening in the league, but also provide you with actionable fantasy league information that you can put to use on your team.

TG Fantasy Baseball If you want more than stats and news, check out TG Fantasy Baseball. The site features player reports and depth charts so you can see how often your players will be in the game, but its best features are its Dollar Values and Projections tools. The Dollar Values tool comes in handy if player salaries and salary caps are implemented in your league, because it tells you how many players at each position you should be fielding. The site's Projections tool gives you information on how well your players should perform over the course of the year. I've found that both tools work quite well and return accurate results.

Don Reisinger is a technology columnist who has written about everything from HDTVs to computers to Flowbee Haircut Systems. Don is a member of the CNET Blog Network, and posts at The Digital Home. He is not an employee of CNET. Disclosure.

Monday, March 9, 2009

from Lifehacker

Icon Grabber Converts Favicons to Image Files

Web application Icon Grabber takes a Favicon, the little icon in the address bar, and saves it to PNG, GIF or JPG format from any web site.

Using the web application couldn't be simpler—just paste in the URL, select the output format, click the Grab It button, and then right-click and save the grabbed icon from the page. Once you've saved the icon you can use it in a dock or launcher application that supports regular image files. Note that even without using this application, you can download the favicon as an ICO file from almost any website by simply appending /favicon.ico to the end of the URL, and using the right-click menu to save to a file—but converting icons to image format takes another step.

Icon Grabber is free, simple, and easy to use. To create your own Favicons, use previously mentioned Favicon Generator, then assign them to any Firefox bookmark with the previously mentioned Favicon Picker extension, or you can just block distracting animated favicons.

from Lifehacker

FrameFinder Sizes Up the Right Frames for Your Face

Web application FrameFinder lets you try size up frames online so you can find just the right glasses for your face without dealing with the pushy LensCrafters folk.

Just upload a pic, step through the simple wizard, and start sizing yourself up for a new pair of killer frames. It's a great little tool if you're not sure what sort of frames fit your face (though we've got a few rules of thumb for that, too), and since you can save bundles of cash by buying eyeglasses online, it offers a great way to do a little virtual sampling before you buy blindly.

The most annoying thing about the site is that it requires you to register to use it, including your phone number, but 555-555-5555 worked just fine for me. If you try it out and find a good frame, share your results in the comments.

Saturday, February 28, 2009


Pod to PC Transfers Music from Any iPod, iPhone Onto Your PC [Downloads]

Windows only: Pod to PC can grab the music and movies off nearly any Windows-formatted iPod for transferring to your PC, and avoids duplicates while doing so.

Install and fire up the software, and if your iPod is connected by a USB transfer cable, Pod to PC should find it and offer up basic stats:

Most notable is that, along with an iTunes-like read on space use, iPod name, and the like, Pod to PC shows how many of the tracks on a device are already loaded into iTunes on your computer. So that "Automatic Transfer" button smooshed into the lower-right corner (Pod to PC has a pretty rough graphical interface, in case you couldn't tell) does exactly that, grabbing uncopied tracks and placing them. Or you can tackle a transfer manually:

Advanced visual cues show you what's in your library already, what's protected or free, and what type of media each file is. Select the files you want, or use the upper-right search bar to narrow-as-you-type search. When you're done selecting, head to the File menu, hit "Initiate transfer," and you'll get a pop-up window giving you the report. Pod to PC can't place the files in iTunes itself, but it does create an "Import File," a simple text document, that iTunes can read to bring in multiple files at once.

The caveats: Pod to PC is not the most stable software we've tested—the inteface is a smooshy thing, and crashes and freeze-ups, especially when attempting to preview a file, aren't exactly rare. But it does work with an iPod touch or iPhone just as well as a first-generation white iPod, and does a nice job of sorting what you do and don't have already. For a full guide to reliable transfer software, check out our guide to copying music from your iPhone or iPod to your computer for free.

Pod to PC is a free download for Windows systems only.


Stream and Download Music with MP3 Search

MP3 Search is a web music finder with a simple interface. If you're in need of some quick tunes to listen to, or you're hunting down pieces of an obscure mix, take a peek.

Similar to previously reviewed Mix Turtle, MP3 Search sports a spartan, grab-it-and-go interface. Unlike Mix Turtle, though, you can download the tracks to your computer. The music you select loads in a small pop-up flash player for preview or quick listen, though you can't queue up multiple tracks as on Seeqpod.

For more methods to scour the web for musical bounty, make sure to check out our guide to finding free music. If you have a favorite site for streaming music or finding tunes, sound off in the comments below.

from Lifehacker

Computer Repair Kit Packs Dozens of Tools in One Portable Package

Windows only: Portable system-fixing bundle Computer Repair Utility Kit puts 57 recovery tools into a single package. That gives you easy access to important system utilities without the fuss of building your own toolkit.

The launcher can be run directly from the folder or copied to a flash drive for access from any system, with a system tray menu for quick access to the included tools—which can be tweaked to add your own favorite portable applications. Most of the included utilities are familiar to Lifehacker readers, with well-known utilities like reader favorites CCleaner, PC Decrapifier, and Process Explorer along with dozens of other utilities that perform tasks ranging from killing spyware to system tweaking—and a copy of Portable Firefox is even included for good measure. If you haven't taken the time to build your own flash drive toolkit, this download might be worth a look to get you started.

Computer Repair Utility Kit is a free download for Windows, though readers should be forewarned that some of the actual download links on the home page purposely take you to ad-ridden, pop-up crazy download sites—getting to the actual download is more than a little annoying.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Recovery from Freeware Home

DiskDigger can recover files from any type of media that your computer can read. This includes USB flash drives, memory cards (SD, CompactFlash, Memory Stick, etc.), and of course your hard drive. The types of files that it recovers includes photos, videos, music, documents, and other formats. DiskDigger works by thoroughly scanning each sector of your media for traces of files.